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Senior citizens can enjoy a heightened quality of life thanks to the immense, versatile therapeutics of cannabis. Whether you’re smoking, dabbing, vaping, or using CBD oil and infusions, there is always a way to get potent pain relief and a noticeable lift to your mood. If you’re open cured dried herbs, then there are endless strains of marijuana to choose from, each giving a profoundly different effect. Same goes for the various concentrations of cannabinoids in CBD-oils and extracts, as well as other products like edibles. Getting the medical benefits doesn’t mean that you need to get high, and if you do, there are tons of options for you. Let’s take a close look at how cannabis can help seniors improve their quality of life.

Cannabis improves mental acuity & supplies a neuroprotective effect

THC is showing potential as a therapeutic agent in the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease and other clinical conditions of cognitive decline. Studies show that low doses of THC directly interact with the amyloid beta peptides inhibiting their aggregation. These peptides are found in high concentrations in Alzheimer’s patients leading researchers to believe that regular supplementation will slow the onset and possibly prevent

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If West Virginia students are interested in participating in a new program that allows them to attend community colleges for free, they’ll have to make sure they haven’t smoked any marijuana recently.

It was announced on Thursday that THC will be on a list of banned substances for participants in the program, funding for which was approved unanimously by the state Senate in February via Senate Bill 284.

“The motivation for the bill is to lift the education-attainment level for all West Virginians and give them a pathway to a brighter future,” said legislation sponsor and state Senate president Mitch Carmichael at the time of the bill’s passage. “From a state perspective, it helps us say to the world that our workforce is drug-free, trained, educated, and ready to go to work.”

A consultant who is working on the program announced that applicants will also be tested for opiates, oxycodone, hydrocodone, cocaine, amphetamines, and other substances. If a student is able to provide proof that they are consuming a drug for a medical purpose, they will be exempted from tests on the substance.  

The program will start in the fall of this year. Charleston Gazette-Mail reports that the drug

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The United Food and Commercial Workers union is now a major force in marijuana politics — but criticisms of it have grown with its influence.

No one knows more about the complicated alliance between unions and the cannabis industry than Dale Sky Jones, chancellor of Oakland’s Oaksterdam University, a marijuana trade school. She calls herself “Patient Zero.”

In 2010, major unions were just starting to throw their weight behind weed in California as part of Prop 19, a ballot initiative for recreational marijuana. Jones says an organizer for the United Food and Commercial Workers International Union (UFCW) walked into the campaign office for Prop 19, a campaign Oaksterdam’s founder spearheaded, and said, “You’re not just a bunch of tree-hugging, crystal-gripping hippies carrying signs. You actually have a statewide campaign on the ballot.”

– Read the entire article at Rolling Stone.

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Health Canada will unveil details about rollout today.

New cannabis products — like edibles, beverages, topicals and extracts — will be for sale legally in Canada in mid-December.

Regulations will come into effect on Oct. 17, and the products will be available two months later, Radio-Canada has learned.

Details on the final regulations and timeline will be released Friday by Health Canada.

– Read the entire article at CBC News.

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Cannabis edible and topical products will be available to Canadian consumers by the middle of December, according to media reports. Rules to regulate the products are expected to be released by the federal health agency Health Canada on Friday and would go into effect on October 17, one year after Canada legalized cannabis with the passage of Bill C-45. Initial regulations only included provisions that allowed the sale of cannabis flower and oils.

Once the new regulations for cannabis edibles and topicals go into effect in October, manufacturers would be given 60 days to implement them before products go on sale in December.

Sources speaking with CTV News on the condition of anonymity revealed that the regulations are expected to limit the amount of THC in edible products to 10 milligrams per package. Edibles would also be subject to strict requirements to lessen their appeal to children, including limitations on the packaging and the shape of products. THC capsules are also expected to be allowed by the new regulations, which would limit the potency to 10 milligrams of THC per capsule and 1,000 milligrams THC per package.

Cannabis products will not be permitted to contain tobacco, nicotine, or added caffeine.

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